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Fixed-Width-Field File Format parser and tools

Project Description

FWF - Fixed-Width-Field File Format parser and tools

Lib to help you handle those files that joins all data relying only on the lenght of each field. I made this for myself because I was having some bad times to filter and debug data from some huge stock market files with hundreds of thousands of lines.

When should I use this?

When you have files like this:

USAR19570526Fbe56008be36eDianne Mcintosh WhateverMedic        \n
USMI19940213M706a6e0afc3dRosalyn Clark   WhateverComedian     \n
USWI19510403M451ed630accbShirley Gray    WhateverComedian     \n
USMD20110508F7e5cd7324f38Georgia Frank   WhateverComedian     \n
USPA19930404Mecc7f17c16a6Virginia LambertWhateverShark tammer \n
USVT19770319Fd2bd88100facRichard Botto   WhateverTime traveler\n
USOK19910917F9c704139a6e3Alberto Giel    WhateverStudent      \n
USNV20120604F5f02187599d7Mildred Henke   WhateverSuper hero   \n
USRI19820125Fcf54b2eb5219Marc Kidd       WhateverMedic        \n
USME20080503F0f51da89a299Kelly Crose     WhateverComedian     \n
...

where each line represents one dataset and the data is concatenated on that line.

Why should I use this?

Even though parsing this kind of file is pretty easy you may want to filter some of its data. Also this lib helps you to visualize you data and play with it directly on python shell. So that file will easily become this:

+------------------+--------+------------+----------+-------+----------+---------------+-----+
| name             | gender | birthday   | location | state | universe | profession    | age |
+------------------+--------+------------+----------+-------+----------+---------------+-----+
| Dianne Mcintosh  | F      | 1957-05-26 | US       | AR    | Whatever | Medic         | 60  |
| Rosalyn Clark    | M      | 1994-02-13 | US       | MI    | Whatever | Comedian      | 23  |
| Shirley Gray     | M      | 1951-04-03 | US       | WI    | Whatever | Comedian      | 66  |
| Georgia Frank    | F      | 2011-05-08 | US       | MD    | Whatever | Comedian      | 6   |
| Virginia Lambert | M      | 1993-04-04 | US       | PA    | Whatever | Shark tammer  | 24  |
| Richard Botto    | F      | 1977-03-19 | US       | VT    | Whatever | Time traveler | 40  |
| Alberto Giel     | F      | 1991-09-17 | US       | OK    | Whatever | Student       | 26  |
| Mildred Henke    | F      | 2012-06-04 | US       | NV    | Whatever | Super hero    | 5   |
| Marc Kidd        | F      | 1982-01-25 | US       | RI    | Whatever | Medic         | 35  |
| Kelly Crose      | F      | 2008-05-03 | US       | ME    | Whatever | Comedian      | 9   |
+------------------+--------+------------+----------+-------+----------+---------------+-----+

Features

  • Parse and objectify your file
  • Filter objects using a django-like syntax
  • Reorganize your data
  • Vizualization as table (thanks to terminaltables)
  • Order by column
  • Add or remove columns
  • Count a subset
  • Uniqueness of data on a column

Instalation

Just install using pip

pip install fwf

Usage

Setting up your parser

First thing you need to know is the width of each column on your file. There’s no magic here. You will need to find out.

Lets take this file as example. Here its first line:

'US       AR19570526Fbe56008be36eDianne Mcintosh         Whatever    Medic        \n'

By testing, splitting, trying or whatever I know that: - First 9 characters are reserved for that person location - Next 2 characters are for her state - Next 8 are her birthday - Next 1 is her gender - Next 12 I dont have a clue and I dont care - Next 24 are her name

and so on. But I only want name, birthday and gender so let’s write it’s model

from fwf import BaseLineParser


class Human(BaseLineParser):
    """Parser for each line of that humans.txt file."""

    _map = {"name": slice(32, 56),
            "gender": slice(19, 20),
            "birthday": slice(11, 19)}

The slices represents the first and last positions of each information in the line and that’s the most basic line parser you need. Now we are going to use it with the file parser.

from pytwt3 import BaseFileParser

parsed = BaseFileParser.open("examples/humans.txt", line_parser=Human)

That’s it. Your file is parsed and now usable but let’s put it together:

from fwf import BaseLineParser, BaseFileParser


class Human(BaseLineParser):
    """Parser for each line of that humans.txt file."""

    _map = {"name": slice(32, 56),
            "gender": slice(19, 20),
            "birthday": slice(11, 19)}


parsed = BaseFileParser.open("examples/humans.txt", line_parser=Human)

or even

from fwf import BaseLineParser, BaseFileParser


class Human(BaseLineParser):
    """Parser for each line of that humans.txt file."""

    _map = {"name": slice(32, 56),
            "gender": slice(19, 20),
            "birthday": slice(11, 19)}


class HumanFileParser(BaseFileParser):
    """Parser for that humans.txt file."""

    _line_parser = Human

parsed = HumanFileParser.open("examples/humans.txt")

We will discuss those classes in the future

Queryset

With your parsed file as a BaseFileParser instance you have all objects stored as a Queryset instance in “.objects” attribute. So:

>>> parsed = HumanFileParser.open("examples/humans.txt")
>>> # slices returns a smaller queryset instance
>>> parsed.objects[0:5]
+------------------+----------+--------+
| name             | birthday | gender |
+------------------+----------+--------+
| Dianne Mcintosh  | 19570526 | F      |
| Rosalyn Clark    | 19940213 | M      |
| Shirley Gray     | 19510403 | M      |
| Georgia Frank    | 20110508 | F      |
| Virginia Lambert | 19930404 | M      |
+------------------+----------+--------+
>>> # while getting a specific item returns a parsed line instance
>>> parsed.objects[327]
+------------+----------+--------+
| name       | birthday | gender |
+------------+----------+--------+
| Jack Brown | 19490106 | M      |
+------------+----------+--------+
>>> # Note that the table is only a shell representation of the objects
>>> parsed.objects[327].name
'Jack Brown'
>>> parsed.objects[327].birthday
'19490106'
>>> parsed.objects[327].gender
'M'
>>> tuple(parsed.objects[327])
('M', 'Jack Brown', '19490106')
>>> list(parsed.objects[327])
['M', 'Jack Brown', '19490106']
>>> # To prevent the fields from changing order use OrderedDict instead of dict on _map. More about that later

.filter(**kwargs)

Here is where the magic happens. A filtered queryset will always return a new queryset that can be filtered too and so and so

>>> parsed = HumanFileParser.open("examples/humans.txt")
>>> first5 = parsed.objects[:5]
>>> # 'first5' is a Queryset instance just as 'parsed.objects' but with only a few objects
>>> firts5
+------------------+----------+--------+
| name             | birthday | gender |
+------------------+----------+--------+
| Dianne Mcintosh  | 19570526 | F      |
| Rosalyn Clark    | 19940213 | M      |
| Shirley Gray     | 19510403 | M      |
| Georgia Frank    | 20110508 | F      |
| Virginia Lambert | 19930404 | M      |
+------------------+----------+--------+
>>> # And it still can be filtered
>>> first5.filter(gender="F")
+------------------+----------+--------+
| name             | birthday | gender |
+------------------+----------+--------+
| Dianne Mcintosh  | 19570526 | F      |
| Georgia Frank    | 20110508 | F      |
+------------------+----------+--------+
>>> # with multiple keywords arguments
>>> firts5.filter(gender="M", birthday__gte="19900101")
+------------------+----------+--------+
| name             | birthday | gender |
+------------------+----------+--------+
| Rosalyn Clark    | 19940213 | M      |
| Virginia Lambert | 19930404 | M      |
+------------------+----------+--------+
>>> # or chained filters
>>> firts5.filter(name__endswith="k").filter(gender=F)
+------------------+----------+--------+
| name             | birthday | gender |
+------------------+----------+--------+
| Georgia Frank    | 20110508 | F      |
+------------------+----------+--------+

Some special filters may be used with __ notation. Here are some but not limited to:

  • __in: value is in a list
  • __lt: less than
  • __lte: less than or equals
  • __gt: greater than
  • __gte: greater than or equals
  • __ne: not equals
  • __len: field lenght (without trailing spaces)
  • __startswith: value starts with that string
  • __endswith: value ends with that string

It will actually look for any attribute or method of the field object that matches with ‘object.somefilter’ or ‘object.__somefilter__’ and call it or compare with it. So let’s say that you use the _after_parse() method to convert the ‘birthday’ field into datetime.date instances you can now filter using, for example, .filter(birthday__year=1957)

.exclude(**kwargs)

Pretty much the opposite of .filter()

>>> parsed = HumanFileParser.open("examples/humans.txt")
>>> first5 = parsed.objects[:5]
>>> firts5
+------------------+----------+--------+
| name             | birthday | gender |
+------------------+----------+--------+
| Dianne Mcintosh  | 19570526 | F      |
| Rosalyn Clark    | 19940213 | M      |
| Shirley Gray     | 19510403 | M      |
| Georgia Frank    | 20110508 | F      |
| Virginia Lambert | 19930404 | M      |
+------------------+----------+--------+
>>> first5.exclude(gender="F")
+------------------+----------+--------+
| name             | birthday | gender |
+------------------+----------+--------+
| Rosalyn Clark    | 19940213 | M      |
| Shirley Gray     | 19510403 | M      |
| Virginia Lambert | 19930404 | M      |
+------------------+----------+--------+

.order_by(field_name, reverse=False)

Reorder the whole queryset sorting by that given field

>>> parsed = HumanFileParser.open("examples/humans.txt")
>>> parsed.objects[:5]
+------------------+----------+--------+
| name             | birthday | gender |
+------------------+----------+--------+
| Dianne Mcintosh  | 19570526 | F      |
| Rosalyn Clark    | 19940213 | M      |
| Shirley Gray     | 19510403 | M      |
| Georgia Frank    | 20110508 | F      |
| Virginia Lambert | 19930404 | M      |
+------------------+----------+--------+
>>> parsed.objects[:5].order_by("name")
+------------------+--------+----------+
| name             | gender | birthday |
+------------------+--------+----------+
| Dianne Mcintosh  | F      | 19570526 |
| Georgia Frank    | F      | 20110508 |
| Rosalyn Clark    | M      | 19940213 |
| Shirley Gray     | M      | 19510403 |
| Virginia Lambert | M      | 19930404 |
+------------------+--------+----------+
>>> parsed.objects[:5].order_by("name", reverse=True)
+------------------+--------+----------+
| name             | gender | birthday |
+------------------+--------+----------+
| Virginia Lambert | M      | 19930404 |
| Shirley Gray     | M      | 19510403 |
| Rosalyn Clark    | M      | 19940213 |
| Georgia Frank    | F      | 20110508 |
| Dianne Mcintosh  | F      | 19570526 |
+------------------+--------+----------+

TODO: Order by more than one field and order by special field

.unique(field_name)

Return a list o unique values for that field. For this example I will use complete line parser for that humans.txt file

from collections import OrderedDict
from fwf import BaseLineParser, BaseFileParser


class CompleteHuman(BaseLineParser):
    """Complete line parser for humans.txt example file."""

    _map = OrderedDict(
        [
            ("name", slice(32, 56)),
            ("gender", slice(19, 20)),
            ("birthday", slice(11, 19)),
            ("location", slice(0, 9)),
            ("state", slice(9, 11)),
            ("universe", slice(56, 68)),
            ("profession", slice(68, 81)),
        ]
    )


class CompleteHumanFileParser(BaseFileParser):
    """Complete file parser for humans.txt example file."""

    _line_parser = CompleteHuman
>>> parsed = CompleteHumanFileParser.open("examples/humans.txt")
>>> parsed.objects[:5]
+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+----------+--------------+
| name             | gender | birthday | location | state | universe | profession   |
+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+----------+--------------+
| Dianne Mcintosh  | F      | 19570526 | US       | AR    | Whatever | Medic        |
| Rosalyn Clark    | M      | 19940213 | US       | MI    | Whatever | Comedian     |
| Shirley Gray     | M      | 19510403 | US       | WI    | Whatever | Comedian     |
| Georgia Frank    | F      | 20110508 | US       | MD    | Whatever | Comedian     |
| Virginia Lambert | M      | 19930404 | US       | PA    | Whatever | Shark tammer |
+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+----------+--------------+
>>> # Looking into all objects
>>> parsed.objects.unique("gender")
['F', 'M']
>>> parsed.objects.unique("profession")
['', 'Time traveler', 'Student', 'Berserk', 'Hero', 'Soldier', 'Super hero', 'Shark tammer', 'Artist', 'Hunter', 'Cookie maker', 'Comedian', 'Mecromancer', 'Programmer', 'Medic', 'Siren']
>>> parsed.objects.unique("state")
['', 'MT', 'WA', 'NY', 'AZ', 'MD', 'LA', 'IN', 'IL', 'WY', 'OK', 'NJ', 'VT', 'OH', 'AR', 'FL', 'DE', 'KS', 'NC', 'NM', 'MA', 'NH', 'ME', 'CT', 'MS', 'RI', 'ID', 'HI', 'NE', 'TN', 'AL', 'MN', 'TX', 'WV', 'KY', 'CA', 'NV', 'AK', 'IA', 'PA', 'UT', 'SD', 'CO', 'MI', 'VA', 'GA', 'ND', 'OR', 'SC', 'WI', 'MO']

TODO: Unique by special field

.count()

Return how many objects are there on that queryset

>>> parsed = CompleteHumanFileParser.open("examples/humans.txt")
>>> # Total
>>> parsed.objects.count()
10012
>>> # How many are women
>>> parsed.objects.filter(gender="F").count()
4979
>>> # How many womans from New York or California
>>> parsed.objects.filter(gender="F", state__in=["NY", "CA"]).count()
197
>>> # How many mens born on 1960 or later
>>> parsed.objects.filter(gender="M").exclude(birthday__lt="19600101").count()
4321

.values(*fields)

This method should be used to actually return data from a queryset. Will return the specified fields only or all of them if none is specified.

Returns a ValuesList instance which is in fact a extended list object with overwriten __repr__ method just to look like a table on shell, so on every other aspect it is a list. May be a list o tuples, if more the one column is returned, or a simple list if only one field was specified

>>> parsed = CompleteHumanFileParser.open("examples/humans.txt")
>>> parsed.objects[:5].values("name")
+------------------+
| name             |
+------------------+
| Dianne Mcintosh  |
| Rosalyn Clark    |
| Shirley Gray     |
| Georgia Frank    |
| Virginia Lambert |
+------------------+
>>> # even though it looks like a table it is actually a list
>>> parsed.objects[:5].values("name")[:]
['Dianne Mcintosh',
 'Rosalyn Clark',
 'Shirley Gray',
 'Georgia Frank',
 'Virginia Lambert']
>>> parsed.objects[:5].values("name", "state")
+------------------+-------+
| name             | state |
+------------------+-------+
| Dianne Mcintosh  | AR    |
| Rosalyn Clark    | MI    |
| Shirley Gray     | WI    |
| Georgia Frank    | MD    |
| Virginia Lambert | PA    |
+------------------+-------+
>>> # or a list o tuples
>>> parsed.objects[:5].values("name", "state")[:]
[('Dianne Mcintosh', 'AR'),
 ('Rosalyn Clark', 'MI'),
 ('Shirley Gray', 'WI'),
 ('Georgia Frank', 'MD'),
 ('Virginia Lambert', 'PA')]
>>> # If no field is specified it will return all
>>> parsed.objects[:5].values()
+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+----------+--------------+
| name             | gender | birthday | location | state | universe | profession   |
+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+----------+--------------+
| Dianne Mcintosh  | F      | 19570526 | US       | AR    | Whatever | Medic        |
| Rosalyn Clark    | M      | 19940213 | US       | MI    | Whatever | Comedian     |
| Shirley Gray     | M      | 19510403 | US       | WI    | Whatever | Comedian     |
| Georgia Frank    | F      | 20110508 | US       | MD    | Whatever | Comedian     |
| Virginia Lambert | M      | 19930404 | US       | PA    | Whatever | Shark tammer |
+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+----------+--------------+
>>> parsed.objects[:5].values()[:]
[('Dianne Mcintosh', 'F', '19570526', 'US', 'AR', 'Whatever', 'Medic'),
 ('Rosalyn Clark', 'M', '19940213', 'US', 'MI', 'Whatever', 'Comedian'),
 ('Shirley Gray', 'M', '19510403', 'US', 'WI', 'Whatever', 'Comedian'),
 ('Georgia Frank', 'F', '20110508', 'US', 'MD', 'Whatever', 'Comedian'),
 ('Virginia Lambert', 'M', '19930404', 'US', 'PA', 'Whatever', 'Shark tammer')]
>>> # Note that you dont need to slice the result with '[:]'. I am only doing it to show the response structure behind the table representation

There is also 2 hidden fields that may be used, if needed:

  • _line_number: The line number on the original file, counting even if some line is skipped during parsing
  • _unparsed_line: The unchanged and unparsed original line, with original line breakers at the end
>>> parsed = CompleteHumanFileParser.open("examples/humans.txt")
>>> parsed.objects.order_by("birthday")[:5].values("_line_number", "name")
+--------------+------------------+
| _line_number | name             |
+--------------+------------------+
| 4328         | John Cleese      |
| 9282         | Johnny Andres    |
| 8466         | Oscar Callaghan  |
| 3446         | Gilbert Garcia   |
| 6378         | Helen Villarreal |
+--------------+------------------+
>>> # or a little hacking to add it
>>> parsed.objects.order_by("birthday")[:5].values("_line_number", *parsed._line_parser._map.keys())
+--------------+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+--------------+------------+
| _line_number | name             | gender | birthday | location | state | universe     | profession |
+--------------+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+--------------+------------+
| 4328         | John Cleese      | M      | 19391027 | UK       |       | Monty Python | Comedian   |
| 9282         | Johnny Andres    | F      | 19400107 | US       | TX    | Whatever     | Student    |
| 8466         | Oscar Callaghan  | M      | 19400121 | US       | ID    | Whatever     | Comedian   |
| 3446         | Gilbert Garcia   | M      | 19400125 | US       | NC    | Whatever     | Student    |
| 6378         | Helen Villarreal | F      | 19400125 | US       | MD    | Whatever     |            |
+--------------+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+--------------+------------+
>>> # Note the trailing whitespaces and breakline on _unparsed_line
>>> parsed.objects[:5].values("_line_number", "_unparsed_line")
+--------------+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| _line_number | _unparsed_line                                                                    |
+--------------+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| 1            | US       AR19570526Fbe56008be36eDianne Mcintosh         Whatever    Medic         |
|              |                                                                                   |
| 2            | US       MI19940213M706a6e0afc3dRosalyn Clark           Whatever    Comedian      |
|              |                                                                                   |
| 3            | US       WI19510403M451ed630accbShirley Gray            Whatever    Comedian      |
|              |                                                                                   |
| 4            | US       MD20110508F7e5cd7324f38Georgia Frank           Whatever    Comedian      |
|              |                                                                                   |
| 5            | US       PA19930404Mecc7f17c16a6Virginia Lambert        Whatever    Shark tammer  |
|              |                                                                                   |
+--------------+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
>>> parsed.objects[:5].values("_line_number", "_unparsed_line")[:]
[(1, 'US       AR19570526Fbe56008be36eDianne Mcintosh         Whatever    Medic        \n'),
 (2, 'US       MI19940213M706a6e0afc3dRosalyn Clark           Whatever    Comedian     \n'),
 (3, 'US       WI19510403M451ed630accbShirley Gray            Whatever    Comedian     \n'),
 (4, 'US       MD20110508F7e5cd7324f38Georgia Frank           Whatever    Comedian     \n'),
 (5, 'US       PA19930404Mecc7f17c16a6Virginia Lambert        Whatever    Shark tammer \n')]

TODO: Allow special fields to be used

Models

fwf.BaseLineParser

This is the class responsible for the actual parsing and have to be extended to set its parsing map, as explained on Setting up your parser. It also responsible for all the magic before and after parsing by the use of _before_parse() and _after_parse() methods

_before_parse()

This method is called before the line is parsed. At this point self have:

  • self._unparsed_line: Original unchanged line
  • self._parsable_line: Line to be parsed. If None given self._unparsed_line wil be used
  • self._line_number: File line number
  • self._headers: Name of all soon-to-be-available fields
  • self._map: The field mapping for the parsing

Use it to pre-filter, pre-validade or process the line before parsing.

Ex:

from collections import OrderedDict
from fwf import BaseLineParser, InvalidLineError


class CustomLineParser(BaseLineParser):
    """Validated, uppercased U.S.A-only humans."""

    _map = OrderedDict(
        [
            ("name", slice(32, 56)),
            ("gender", slice(19, 20)),
            ("birthday", slice(11, 19)),
            ("location", slice(0, 9)),
            ("state", slice(9, 11)),
            ("universe", slice(56, 68)),
            ("profession", slice(68, 81)),
        ]
    )

    def _before_parse(self):
        """Do some pre-process before the parsing."""
        # Validate line size to avoid malformed lines
        # an InvalidLineError will make this line to be skipped
        # any other error will break the parsing
        if not len(self._unparsed_line) == 82:
            raise InvalidLineError()

        # As I know that the first characters are reserved for location I will
        # pre-filter any person that are not from U.S.A (Trumping) even before
        # parsing it
        if not self._unparsed_line.startswith("US"):
            raise InvalidLineError()

        # Then put everything uppercased
        self._parsable_line = self._unparsed_line.upper()
        # Note that instead of changing self._unparsed_line I've set the new
        # string to self._parsable_line. I don't want to loose the unparsed
        # value because it is useful for further debug

Then use it as you like

>>> parsed = BaseFileParser.open("examples/humans.txt", CustomLineParser)
>>> parsed.objects[:5]
+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+----------+--------------+
| name             | gender | birthday | location | state | universe | profession   |
+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+----------+--------------+
| DIANNE MCINTOSH  | F      | 19570526 | US       | AR    | WHATEVER | MEDIC        |
| ROSALYN CLARK    | M      | 19940213 | US       | MI    | WHATEVER | COMEDIAN     |
| SHIRLEY GRAY     | M      | 19510403 | US       | WI    | WHATEVER | COMEDIAN     |
| GEORGIA FRANK    | F      | 20110508 | US       | MD    | WHATEVER | COMEDIAN     |
| VIRGINIA LAMBERT | M      | 19930404 | US       | PA    | WHATEVER | SHARK TAMMER |
+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+----------+--------------+
>>> # Note that everything is uppercased
>>> # And there is nobody who is not from US
>>> parsed.objects.exclude(location="US").count()
0
>>> parsed.objects.unique("location")
['US']

_after_parse()

This method is called after the line is parsed. At this point you have a already parsed line and now you may create new fields, alter some existing or combine those. You still may filter some objects.

Ex:

from datetime import datetime
from collections import OrderedDict
from fwf import BaseLineParser, InvalidLineError


class CustomLineParser(BaseLineParser):
    """Age-available, address-set employed human."""

    _map = OrderedDict(
        [
            ("name", slice(32, 56)),
            ("gender", slice(19, 20)),
            ("birthday", slice(11, 19)),
            ("location", slice(0, 9)),
            ("state", slice(9, 11)),
            ("universe", slice(56, 68)),
            ("profession", slice(68, 81)),
        ]
    )

    def _after_parse(self):
        """Customization on parsed line object."""
        try:
            # Parse birthday as datetime.date object
            self.birthday = datetime.strptime(self.birthday, "%Y%m%d").date()
        except ValueError:
            # There is some "unknown" values on my example file so I decided to
            # set birthday as 1900-01-01 as failover. I also could just skip
            # those lines by raising InvalidLineError
            self.birthday = datetime(1900, 1, 1).date()

        # Set a new attribute 'age'
        # Yeah, I know, it's not the proper way to calc someone's age but stil...
        self.age = datetime.today().year - self.birthday.year

        # Combine 'location' and 'state' to create 'address' field
        self.address = "{}, {}".format(self.location, self.state)
        # and remove location and state
        del self.location
        del self.state

        # then update table headers so 'age' and 'address' become available and
        # remove 'location' and 'state'
        self._update_headers()
        # You will note that the new columns will be added at the end of the
        # table. If you want some specific column order just set self._headers
        # manually

        # And also skip those who does not have a profession
        if not self.profession:
            raise InvalidLineError()

Then just use as you like

>>> parsed = BaseFileParser.open("examples/humans.txt", CustomLineParser)
>>> parsed.objects[:5]
+------------------+--------+------------+----------+--------------+---------+-----+
| name             | gender | birthday   | universe | profession   | address | age |
+------------------+--------+------------+----------+--------------+---------+-----+
| Dianne Mcintosh  | F      | 1957-05-26 | Whatever | Medic        | US, AR  | 60  |
| Rosalyn Clark    | M      | 1994-02-13 | Whatever | Comedian     | US, MI  | 23  |
| Shirley Gray     | M      | 1951-04-03 | Whatever | Comedian     | US, WI  | 66  |
| Georgia Frank    | F      | 2011-05-08 | Whatever | Comedian     | US, MD  | 6   |
| Virginia Lambert | M      | 1993-04-04 | Whatever | Shark tammer | US, PA  | 24  |
+------------------+--------+------------+----------+--------------+---------+-----+
>>> # Note that birthday is now a datetime.date instance
>>> parsed.objects[0].birthday
datetime.date(1957, 5, 26)
>>> # and you can use datetime attributes as special filters
>>> parsed.objects.filter(birthday__day=4, birthday__month=7)[:5]
+--------------------+--------+------------+----------+------------+---------+-----+
| name               | gender | birthday   | universe | profession | address | age |
+--------------------+--------+------------+----------+------------+---------+-----+
| Christopher Symons | M      | 2006-07-04 | Whatever | Comedian   | US, LA  | 11  |
| Thomas Hughes      | F      | 2012-07-04 | Whatever | Medic      | US, PA  | 5   |
| Anthony French     | F      | 2012-07-04 | Whatever | Student    | US, ND  | 5   |
| Harry Carson       | M      | 1989-07-04 | Whatever | Student    | US, AK  | 28  |
| Margaret Walks     | M      | 2012-07-04 | Whatever | Comedian   | US, AZ  | 5   |
+--------------------+--------+------------+----------+------------+---------+-----+
>>> parsed.objects.filter(birthday__gte=datetime(2000, 1, 1).date()).order_by("birthday")[:5]
+---------------+--------+------------+----------+--------------+---------+-----+
| name          | gender | birthday   | universe | profession   | address | age |
+---------------+--------+------------+----------+--------------+---------+-----+
| Peggy Brinlee | M      | 2000-01-01 | Whatever | Programmer   | US, CO  | 17  |
| Tamara Kidd   | M      | 2000-01-03 | Whatever | Artist       | US, MN  | 17  |
| Victor Fraley | M      | 2000-01-04 | Whatever | Shark tammer | US, IL  | 17  |
| Joyce Lee     | F      | 2000-01-05 | Whatever | Programmer   | US, KY  | 17  |
| Leigh Harley  | M      | 2000-01-06 | Whatever | Programmer   | US, NM  | 17  |
+---------------+--------+------------+----------+--------------+---------+-----+
>>> # And age is also usable
>>> parsed.objects.filter(age=18)[:5]
+------------------+--------+------------+----------+--------------+---------+-----+
| name             | gender | birthday   | universe | profession   | address | age |
+------------------+--------+------------+----------+--------------+---------+-----+
| Gladys Martin    | F      | 1999-01-23 | Whatever | Medic        | US, WY  | 18  |
| Justin Salinas   | M      | 1999-07-03 | Whatever | Shark tammer | US, ND  | 18  |
| Sandra Carrousal | F      | 1999-10-09 | Whatever | Super hero   | US, NH  | 18  |
| Edith Briggs     | F      | 1999-04-05 | Whatever | Medic        | US, AL  | 18  |
| Patrick Mckinley | F      | 1999-03-18 | Whatever | Comedian     | US, ME  | 18  |
+------------------+--------+------------+----------+--------------+---------+-----+
>>> parsed.objects.filter(age__lt=18).order_by("age", reverse=True)[:5]
+--------------------+--------+------------+----------+--------------+---------+-----+
| name               | gender | birthday   | universe | profession   | address | age |
+--------------------+--------+------------+----------+--------------+---------+-----+
| Angela Armentrout  | F      | 2000-12-21 | Whatever | Artist       | US, MO  | 17  |
| Christine Strassel | F      | 2000-10-22 | Whatever | Medic        | US, NE  | 17  |
| Christopher Pack   | M      | 2000-03-22 | Whatever | Student      | US, IN  | 17  |
| Manuela Lytle      | M      | 2000-12-18 | Whatever | Shark tammer | US, NV  | 17  |
| Tamara Kidd        | M      | 2000-01-03 | Whatever | Artist       | US, MN  | 17  |
+--------------------+--------+------------+----------+--------------+---------+-----+

fwf.BaseFileParser

This class will center all file data and needs a line parser to do the actual parsing. So you will need a class extended from BaseLineParser. I’ll consider that you already have your CustomLineParser class so:

>>> from fwf import BaseFileParser
>>> # Let's say that you already created your CustomLineParser class
>>> parsed = BaseFileParser.open("examples/humans.txt", CustomLineParser)
>>> parsed.objects[:5]
+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+----------+--------------+
| name             | gender | birthday | location | state | universe | profession   |
+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+----------+--------------+
| Dianne Mcintosh  | F      | 19570526 | US       | AR    | Whatever | Medic        |
| Rosalyn Clark    | M      | 19940213 | US       | MI    | Whatever | Comedian     |
| Shirley Gray     | M      | 19510403 | US       | WI    | Whatever | Comedian     |
| Georgia Frank    | F      | 20110508 | US       | MD    | Whatever | Comedian     |
| Virginia Lambert | M      | 19930404 | US       | PA    | Whatever | Shark tammer |
+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+----------+--------------+

Or you may extend BaseFileParser for semantics sake

from fwf import BaseFileParser


class HumanParser(BaseFileParser):
    """File parser for humans.txt example file."""

    # Let's say that you already created your CustomLineParser class
    _line_parser = CustomLineParser

Now you just

>>> parsed = HumanParser.open("examples/humans.txt")
>>> parsed.objects[:5]
+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+----------+--------------+
| name             | gender | birthday | location | state | universe | profession   |
+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+----------+--------------+
| Dianne Mcintosh  | F      | 19570526 | US       | AR    | Whatever | Medic        |
| Rosalyn Clark    | M      | 19940213 | US       | MI    | Whatever | Comedian     |
| Shirley Gray     | M      | 19510403 | US       | WI    | Whatever | Comedian     |
| Georgia Frank    | F      | 20110508 | US       | MD    | Whatever | Comedian     |
| Virginia Lambert | M      | 19930404 | US       | PA    | Whatever | Shark tammer |
+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+----------+--------------+

.open(filename, line_parser=None)

This class method actually open the given file, parse it, close it and return a parsed file instance. Pretty much every example here is using .open()

You may define your line parser class here, if you what, but for semantics sake I recommend that you extend BaseFileParser to set you line parser there.

Parse an already opened file

You also may parse a already opened file, StringIO, downloaded file or any IO instance that you have. For that just create an instance directly

>>> from fwf import BaseFileParser
>>> # Let's say that you already created your CustomLineParser class
>>> f = open("examples/humans.txt", "r")
>>> parsed = BaseFileParser(f, CustomLineParser)
>>> # Always remember to close your files or use "with" statement to do so
>>> f.close()
>>> parsed.objects[:5]
+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+----------+--------------+
| name             | gender | birthday | location | state | universe | profession   |
+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+----------+--------------+
| Dianne Mcintosh  | F      | 19570526 | US       | AR    | Whatever | Medic        |
| Rosalyn Clark    | M      | 19940213 | US       | MI    | Whatever | Comedian     |
| Shirley Gray     | M      | 19510403 | US       | WI    | Whatever | Comedian     |
| Georgia Frank    | F      | 20110508 | US       | MD    | Whatever | Comedian     |
| Virginia Lambert | M      | 19930404 | US       | PA    | Whatever | Shark tammer |
+------------------+--------+----------+----------+-------+----------+--------------+

.objects attribute

Your parsed file have a .objects attribute. Thats your complete parsed queryset

TODOs:

  • Handle files with no break lines
  • Recursive special filters like: birthday__year__lt
  • Filter with same line like: .filter(start_day=L(“end_day”))
  • Multi-column order like: .order_by(“-age”, “name”)
  • Values using special fields like: .values(“name__len”)
  • Order using special fields like: .order_by(“birthday__year”)
  • Export methods like: .sqlite file or .sql file
  • Write a fixed-width field file (?)(why would someone write those files?)
Release History

Release History

This version
History Node

0.1.0

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